3 Videos of horses enjoying the snow

People have varying opinions on the snow, some love it, some hate it, others just deal with it…but what about our horses? Here are three videos showing how some horses feel about the snow: I love how the horses come blasting through the snow in this video: If a horse could drown in snow…this one would have. I love how he buries his head! The horse seems to be enjoying the trees and the snow…and the snow falling from...

Do you still ride your horse in the snow?

Snow doesn’t have to be the end of your ability to ride. If you know the footing under the snow and ice isn’t and issue then it can be fun to ride. I grew up in Maine and I remember riding when the snow was belly deep on my pony. My mom would often break the trail with her horse first. Our favorite place to ride was in a big field where we knew the footing. The snow was untouched and we would make paths and play games. This is a video of a recent ride that we took in the snow. We were in New Mexico and the footing under the snow was sandy. We also had a guide that knew the trails well....

After an accident with a horse how can I get over my fear? How can I make the process easier?

“Hi Stacy, I am in Australia and I have watched your videos and read some of your posts. I have also heard a lot about you from friends. I was wondering if you have any advice for a horse lover who is terrified of horses. When I was 12 I had an accident and fractured my skull and was in a coma. I was not permitted to get back on for a year. My mum was riding with me and broke her leg saving me. She was in hospital longer than me. We never rode for a long time, which is probably part of the problem. Mum rides sometimes now and is more confident than me. I have had some lessons but circumstances create big gaps between lessons. This means I start over all the time. I can’t remember the accident. I can now be near them it shake and feel sick when I lead them or ride them. How can I make this process easier?”-Kate A. The first thing that popped into my mind was, “Start small, mini small.” Then I read your question again and saw that even leading them causes you stress. I was reminded of how my boys, in a matter of days, dramatically increased in confidence after we got our mini’s. The interesting part was that the horses they had always handled were trained better than the minis…but the minis were small, less intimidating and made us laugh. There are many ways that you could work through this. The biggest red-flag that I see in your question is that you have had circumstances that create...

My non-blanketed horses are attacking the two with blankets…What can I do?

“I’m having an issue today. I need help if you find a moment. I have 7 horses turned out together. They have ALL lived together for at least a year. Today, I blanketed two if them due to incoming inclement weather. One has a cold and the other was clipped and hasn’t re-grown his coat as well as we hoped. My problem is, the non-blanketed horses are attacking the two with blankets. Not a little either. They are full out ATTACKING. Pawing, rearing biting, kicking . It’s rough. What can I do?”-Patti C. Horses have an interesting way of viewing things…don’t they? The easiest and quickest suggestion is to separate them for now. Depending on your set up you could pasture them in view of each other which will also allow the non-blanketed horses to adjust to seeing their friends wearing blankets. Once things calm down a bit you can also do some retraining. Be creative and remember to stay safe. Retraining could take many forms including: a shared fence line to let the horses adjust, stalling blanketed and non-blanketed near each other, tying the aggressive horses and allowing the other horses to move around, the list can get longer depending on how creative you are and what type of set up you have to work with. The following comment is from another blog about horses that were aggressive during group feeding. Listen to how Ashley B. solved her problem: I am in a situation where I am not able to stall my horses so I must feed them together. I have a piglet that is very aggressive to the...

I love the idea of a big open barn or run in for shelter but how do you feed if they chase each other?

During the huge response to yesterdays blog titled Where do you live and what shelter do your horses have? Cindy asked the following question. “I love the idea of a big open barn or run in for shelter but how do you feed? I have a piggie who will chase the others off if I try to feed together. Having the stalls lets me separate them.”-Cindy I have done several things in this situation but I would also love to hear how others have handled this. When I have had horses turned out I tried to put them in similar groups. I often had two pastures, one for the ‘easy’ keepers and one for the young and growing who required more calories. In those pastures I often fed different types of hay due to the calorie needs and also different amounts of ration balancer (a type of grain) or fat supplement if needed. I fed the horses far enough apart that it was not very effective for the horses to move each other. If fed too close together one horse could ‘guard’ more than one feed pile but with more distance they would maybe switch once or twice but frequent switching wasn’t worth it. On the occasion that one horse was a real trouble maker we have also stood and guarded the horses that were being pushed during the grain feeding time, which is the only time this was an issue. I feed a low volume ration balancer so standing guard doesn’t take that long. Another thing I have done is to tie the horse that pushed the others during feeding time....